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Toronto Home - Spring 2016 - To Your Good Health

Everything about Union Juice on Bloor St. W. was designed to promote healthy living. "They do serve coffee, but they're trying to get people to drink fresh-pressed juice more often," says project architect Thomas Tampold, the owner of Yorkville Design Centre. "Our client, Jesper Wahlberg, comes from Denmark and he saw how fabulously it worked there, so he wanted to bring the concept to his new home."

Wahlberg wanted to create a new, funky location in the Annex with a street-art presence to attract students and young professionals. He worked with consultants from Jacknife Branding Digital Web and Industrial Design to define his vision. The company developed a contemporary design featuring a bleached white oak countertop boardered by an indoor mural. 

It was then up to Tampold to turn the 2D drawings into reality.

Originally built as a 19th century home, the location already had a facade of white painted brick, so Tampold was able to cary that exterior motif inside to give the juice bar the ambiance of an outdoor vendor. He extended the mood by setting a community table inside a glassed-in alcove next to the front door.

Other design elements took a bit of creativity to work out. "The bar design had a very interesting tile motif that they proposed for the side," says Tampold. "The tiles were cut on a diagonal, but no tile like that exists, so how do you simulate that in real life? We used Corian and we routed the design into it so that it looked like tile."

The end result is a happy, sunny place to have a drink.

  • Toronto Home - Spring 2016 - To Your Good Health
    Toronto Home - Spring 2016 - To Your Good Health

    Everything about Union Juice on Bloor St. W. was designed to promote healthy living. "They do serve coffee, but they're trying to get people to drink fresh-pressed juice more often," says project architect Thomas Tampold, the owner of Yorkville Design Centre. "Our client, Jesper Wahlberg, comes from Denmark and he saw how fabulously it worked there, so he wanted to bring the concept to his new home."

    Wahlberg wanted to create a new, funky location in the Annex with a street-art presence to attract students and young professionals. He worked with consultants from Jacknife Branding Digital Web and Industrial Design to define his vision. The company developed a contemporary design featuring a bleached white oak countertop boardered by an indoor mural. 

    It was then up to Tampold to turn the 2D drawings into reality.

    Originally built as a 19th century home, the location already had a facade of white painted brick, so Tampold was able to cary that exterior motif inside to give the juice bar the ambiance of an outdoor vendor. He extended the mood by setting a community table inside a glassed-in alcove next to the front door.

    Other design elements took a bit of creativity to work out. "The bar design had a very interesting tile motif that they proposed for the side," says Tampold. "The tiles were cut on a diagonal, but no tile like that exists, so how do you simulate that in real life? We used Corian and we routed the design into it so that it looked like tile."

    The end result is a happy, sunny place to have a drink.

  • Toronto Home - Spring 2016 - To Your Good Health

    Everything about Union Juice on Bloor St. W. was designed to promote healthy living. "They do serve coffee, but they're trying to get people to drink fresh-pressed juice more often," says project architect Thomas Tampold, the owner of Yorkville Design Centre. "Our client, Jesper Wahlberg, comes from Denmark and he saw how fabulously it worked there, so he wanted to bring the concept to his new home."

    Wahlberg wanted to create a new, funky location in the Annex with a street-art presence to attract students and young professionals. He worked with consultants from Jacknife Branding Digital Web and Industrial Design to define his vision. The company developed a contemporary design featuring a bleached white oak countertop boardered by an indoor mural. 

    It was then up to Tampold to turn the 2D drawings into reality.

    Originally built as a 19th century home, the location already had a facade of white painted brick, so Tampold was able to cary that exterior motif inside to give the juice bar the ambiance of an outdoor vendor. He extended the mood by setting a community table inside a glassed-in alcove next to the front door.

    Other design elements took a bit of creativity to work out. "The bar design had a very interesting tile motif that they proposed for the side," says Tampold. "The tiles were cut on a diagonal, but no tile like that exists, so how do you simulate that in real life? We used Corian and we routed the design into it so that it looked like tile."

    The end result is a happy, sunny place to have a drink.

  • Toronto Home – Kitchens 2017 - The Eye Has It
    Toronto Home – Kitchens 2017 - The Eye Has It

    The homeowner visualized the new kitchen designed in the shape of an eye. Here, two distinctive food-preperation zones face each other like a pair of letter C's. The curved counter on the right, topped with Ceasarstone quartz in Blizzard White, is dedicated to the preperation of meat meals. The one on the left, topped with Brazillian granite, is for dairy meals. One of the homeowners says that an element that attracted him to the granite slab was some of it's natural veins, which are reminiscent of a Star of David.

    The glass surface attached to the outside of the island is one piece. It took the homeowners a while to find a company that could furnish a seamless piece of frosted glass to run the 13.5-foot length of the dairy island. The faucets on each of the sinks rotate 360 degrees. Pendant light fixture; Union Lighting & Home; flooring: Terra Legno engineered oak in Desert Sand; painting: J.D. Stevenson; quartzz and granite: Moscone Marble; Dacor cooktop on granite counter: Direct Appliances.

    It may have been one of the most unusual design requests architect Thomas Tampold had ever recieved. The owner of Yorkville Disign Centre had been asked to create a kitchen in the shape of an eye.

    And while the request could have perplexed many architects, Tampold was intrigued and inspired. "My client wanted the eye shape because he could see it would lend itself well to a kosher kitchen," Tampold says. "So I did some sketches that showed part of the kitchen as an upper eyelid and the other half as the lower lid."

    The result is an unusual but appeling configuration in this North York home.

    Tampold was tasked with redesigning the whole house, which was built in the Art Deco style, albeit on one storey. In the extensive renovation of the house's interior and exterior, done by Battison Construction, a second storey was added and the layout was competely reconfigured. While the new structure is distinctly contemporary in style, the rounded shape of one of the corners on the front facade was preserved to honour the building's architectural origins. 

    The new kitchen is located at the back of the house where a wall was bumped out in the shape of a ship's bow. The curvaceous eye-shaped kitchen fits perfectly into the new configuration.

    A kosher kitchen was de rigeur for this couple. "I wanted a kitchen that would be useful and attractive in which I could addess things easily," one of the homeowners says. The design facilitates the couples adherance to Jewish religious dietary laws, which stipulate that meat meals and dairy meals must be prepared and consumed separately. To that end, there are two refrigerators, two sinks, two cooktops, and two dishwashers. There are also destinct cabinets for the couple's seperate sets of tableware and cutlery in addition to a special cupboard for Passover dishes.

    But it is the design of the kitchen that makes the preperation of kosher dishes so convenient. The two food preperation areas are configured like letter C's facing each other. The counter that abuts a wall, topped with white Ceasarstone quartz, is dedicated to the preparation of meat-based meals. The opposite one, topped with green Brazillian granite and equiped with a Dacor cooktop, is the preparation zone for dairy meals.

    The corner behind the quartz-topped counter features floor-to-ceiling cabinetry, clad in Italian laminate. A Dacor gas range in this area, which is equipped with a custom-made stainless steel range hood, is used to cook meat meals, while the two refrigerators keep meat and dairy provisions strictly seperate.

    Despite the functional nature of the space, it has also proved to be ideal for entertaining.

    "We hosted 80 people here at my daughters engagement party in December," says one of the homeowners. "There was plenty of room for everyone and the flow was perfect."

    Tampold says that one of the advantages of bumping out the back facade is the view it affords the homeowners of neighboring backyards rather than brick walls.

    The homeowners say their collaboration with their architect was a creative one. And Tampold credits his clients with knowing exactly what they wanted. "We worked together to make it sing," he says.

  • Toronto Home - Summer 2017 - A Home For The Long Run
    Toronto Home - Summer 2017 - A Home For The Long Run

    The total makeover of this Art Deco-style bungalow in North York started with two specific "must-haves," a healthy list of "don't wants" and a vision of ensuring the homeowners could live there well into old age.

    At the top of the "must-have" list: the owners wanted to keep the distinctive rounded front of the existing house that included an Art Deco-style curved corner of windows. The other item was rather unique: the kitchen had to be designed "in the shape of an eye" (featured in Toronto Home's Kitchens issue).

    The owners had a very percise concept of how they wanted their kosher kitchen to look and function.

    On the "don't want" list: no stucco, no brick, nothing that required maintenence or upkeep on the exterior. And they didn't want it to look like a box.

    As for the vision fo the living at this address for the rest of the lives, this was based on very practical realities. The woman of the house had once worked in the health-care field. She had seen first hand how aging homeowners are often forced to leave their private residences becausethey can no longer function in them. She and her husband did not want that. So they requested features that could accomodate the possibility of reduced mobilitly. That meant the installation of an elevator to access all levels, including the second storey that would be added; zero-clearance tubs and showers; light switches at hand level to prevent having to reach; faucets that take aging into account; and pull down levers to give easy access to clothing in the master bedroom's closet.

    "We created this for ourselves," explains one of th homeowners. "I like its uniqueness."

    "Most people have never seen anything like it," adds his wife.

    The house definitely hsa a one-of-a-kind vibe. It's a quality that has architect Thomas Tampold of Yorkville Design Centre explains came from the owners appreciation of modern art and shape.

    "It was a small house," says Tampold, who designed the home's transformation. "It was a matter of making it a decent size." This meant adding a second storey. The curve on one corner of the house's front facade was maintained and given new windows that resemble the origineal ones. 

    Key design elements of the interior helped shape the contours of the exterior, he adds. Referring back to one of the owners' "must haves" - a kitchen shaped like an eye - "generated the shape of the back of the house." The back wall of the original building was removed and replaced with a curved bow shaped structure. From the exterior, "the back of the kitchen becomes a prow of a ship that provides much more interesting views," says the architect. 

    Extending the house upward and outwards at the back of posed some challenges. "When it's well designed and interated," Tampold says, thes extention "doesn't seem like a distinct entity. It doesn't feel like an add-on as all. It feels like it's connected. It flows from the original shape."

    The destinctiveness of the look and the use of shape carries through right down to the finishes used - both on the exterior and in the interiors.

    The exterior facade is finished with dark flat-panelled steel on the upper level and white Japanese porcelain tile on the lower level. The back is wrapped in sheets of corrugated steel. A colourful glass mosaic by the main entrance, which is now at the side of the house, adds artistic flair.

    "Even though it has a very modern, clean aesthetic, it's warm," the homeowner says of the couples new 2,700 squere foot living space.

  • 2012 – Toronto Life - Great Spaces in Living Color
    2012 – Toronto Life - Great Spaces in Living Color

    In the 1990s, Joe Gonda and Christine Turner lived in a 6,000-square-foot Rosedale home with five children—four from Turner’s first marriage, one from Gonda’s. When the kids headed off to university, the couple downsized to a 3,500-square-foot house nearby. But that soon felt too big as well. “There were empty bedrooms, and we never went to the third floor other than to look for the cat,” Turner says.

    In 2004 they moved again, to a brand-new 1,700-square-foot condo in Summerhill. The 10th-floor space is just big enough for the two of them, who often work from home (he’s a York University philosophy professor, and she’s an executive coach). They hired Barbara Munn and David Neff of Yorkville Design Centre to turn it into a funky pad, giving the partners free rein except for one major thing: colour. Gonda and Turner were adamant that there be lots of it. Sunny yellow walls with elegant crown mouldings, saffron curtains and a high-gloss coral kitchen—all are a dramatic change from their previous houses. The couple started buying vibrant paintings and prints 20 years ago, but the muted earth tones of their Rosedale home didn’t do the art justice. Over the years, their tastes became bolder and brighter, until their unreserved style exploded here. “We always wanted to amp up the visual decibels,” Gonda says. “Now we finally have.”

    The couches and chairs were purchased at Ridpath’s in the ’80s. They used to be off-white and pale blue, but they got a radical makeover for Gonda and Turner’s new home.

    The couple bought this still life in the Place des Vosges during their first trip to Paris together, in 1991. It’s signed “Tondu,” but they’re doubtful that it’s a genuine work by the famed French artist.

    The ceramic rain boots are from Quint­essence Designs on Yonge Street. Gonda and Turner bought the larger pair because it matched the room’s colour palette. The smaller pair was a gift from Gonda’s son.

    The ceilings are light pink instead of white, a subtle trick to highlight the way the sun catches the yellow walls. The couple owns several ceramics by the local artist Hugo Quattrocchi, including this vase and artichoke. They met Quattrocchi when he owned a store on Roxborough, and they fell for his bright colours and patterns.

    A friend gave Gonda this mounted Socrates cigar box about 30 years ago. Gonda refers to Socrates as his “patron saint” because they both specialize in philosophy.

    The photojournalist Andrew Testa took this photograph in Kosovo on December 31, 1999. Gonda saw it in the New York Times and was enchanted by it. He tracked Testa down and told the artist he didn’t care how much it cost—he had to have the photo.

    Gonda eventually paid £250 for it. Gonda and Turner bought this colourful Bonnici painting in the ’90s. “It was almost like we were buying a vision of how we’d be living in the future,” Turner says.

    The couple picked up the corner chair at an antique store a few years ago. It’s raw silk, and Gonda calls it his “tuffet.” They keep it in the foyer for slipping on boots.

    Designer Barbara Munn picked out the coral cabinets from Downsview Kitchen. They complement the glass-tiled back­splash, which shimmers like fish scales when the light hits it.

    Munn found the saffron fabric for the bedroom drapes to match a swatch Gonda and Turner brought back from Nice, where they spent four months in 2003.

  • 2011 - International Architecture & Design Spring
    2011 - International Architecture & Design Spring

    In a modern kitchen by Yorkville Design Centre, watery-green glass tile is a refreshing match for stainless steel appliances. The look says crisp, cool eficiency.